Joel D. Schilling, MD, PhD

Associate Professor of Medicine, Immunology/Pathology

Related Links

Schilling Lab

Physician Profile

Research Profile

Education

  • BA, Chemistry: Colorado College, Colorado Springs, CO (1996)
  • MD, PhD, Medicine/Immunology: Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (2003)
  • Internship and Residency, Medicine: Barnes-Jewish Hospital, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (2005)
  • Fellowship, Cardiology: Barnes-Jewish Hospital, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (2007)
  • Fellowship, Advanced Heart Failure and Cardiac Transplantation: Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (2009)

Board Certifications

  • Cardiovascular Medicine

Recognition

  • Finalist, Northwestern Cardiovascular Young Investigators Forum, 2011
  • Burton Sobel Award for Excellence in Cardiovascular Research, 2009
  • Jay Cohn New Investigator Award, Heart Failure Society of America, 2009
  • Knowlton Award for Clinical Excellence, 2007
  • Resident of the Year Award, Internal Medicine, 2005
  • The William Peck Book Award in Internal Medicine, awarded in recognition of the highest achievement in internal medicine, 2003
  • David F. Silbert Outstanding Teaching Assistant Award, 2000

Clinical Interests

outpatient and inpatients management of congestive heart failure, pre- and post-heart transplant care, advanced heart failure, heart failure in diabetic patients

Research Interests

My research is focused on understanding the role of inflammation in diabetic heart disease. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a critical role in host defense against pathogens, but they are also activated by noninfectious cellular stress, such as that which occurs in lipid overload, diabetes, and ischemia. My lab is using a combination of cell culture and in vivo models of heart failure and lipotoxic stress to define the mechanisms by which TLR-inflammatory pathways are activated and to address the functional consequences of these pathways in the development and progression of cardiomyopathy. Through this research we hope to create a platform for translational studies involving human subjects with diabetes and heart failure. Ultimately, this work aspires to identify novel targets for treating, and perhaps preventing, heart failure in patients with diabetes.