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Lisa de las Fuentes, MD, MS

Associate Professor of Medicine and Biostatistics

Phone314-362-1076

Fax314-747-8170

Emaillfuentes@wustl.edu

Additional Titles

  • Co-Director, Cardiovascular Imaging and Clinical Research Core Laboratory

Related Links

Education

  • B.A. Human Biology: Stanford University, Stanford, CA (1991)
  • M.D. Medicine: University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, TX (1996)
  • Medical Intern: Parkland Memorial Hospital/Dallas VA Medical Center, Dallas, TX (1997)
  • Medical Resident: Parkland Memorial Hospital/Dallas VA Medical Center, Dallas, TX (1999)
  • Fellowship, Cardiology: Barnes-Jewish Hospital at Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (2003)
  • Fellowship, Nuclear Cardiology: Barnes-Jewish Hospital at Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (2003)
  • Genetic Epidemiology Master of Science Program, Division of Biostatistics: Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (2008)

Recognition

1996

Richard Mays Smith Award in Internal Medicine

2001

American Heart Association / Wyeth-Ayerst Women in Cardiology Travel Grant

2003

Burton E. Sobel Award for Excellence in Cardiovascular Research
AstraZeneca Young Investigators’ Forum, Clinical Fellow Category, 3rd Place
NIH Loan Repayment Program, Competitive Scholarship

2005

NIH Loan Repayment Program, Competitive Scholarship

2006

NIH Loan Repayment Program, Competitive Scholarship

Research Interests

My research is focused on two different areas.  The first is to  evaluating the role played by genetic variants in myocardial metabolism and inflammatory genes in modifying cardiovascular diseases, including hypertensive heart disease and heart failure. Although traditional cardiovascular risk factors, including diabetes, high cholesterol, and obesity, have been known to play important roles in affecting heart and blood vessel function, emerging research suggests that our individual genetic make-up may interact with these environmental factors in modifying these diseases. In particular, genetic variants in myocardial metabolism and inflammation genes have been implicated. The long-term goals of this clinical and translational research project are to identify new targets for the prevention or amelioration of common forms of heart failure.

The second area of research is focused on evaluating cardiovascular disease and health in late middle-age African Americans. Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in the U.S. Nationally, African Americans have higher morbidity-mortality rates from CAD than whites, and particularly so in Missouri and in the city of St. Louis. Depression is also common and has multiple adverse associations with CAD. Despite the well-known CAD-depression adverse associations, the precise genetic factors and molecular mechanisms mediating them remain largely unknown. The overarching hypothesis of this project is that depression contributes to the development and sequelae of CAD through common gene-gene (GXG) and/or gene-environment (GXE) interactions.

Publications

View publications on PubMed.gov